REMEMBERING VERA B. WILLIAMS

I came to love picture books when our kids were little. Every week we’d visit the library and haul home a big bag of books. So I first met Vera B. Williams between the pages of her books.

Sadly, Vera B. died October 16. Happily, we have her wonderful books for comfort.

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If I had to point to the one book that made me want to be a picture book maker, I would point to Vera B. Williams’ Three Days on the River in a Red Canoe.

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Three Days was Williams’ third book, published in 1981 when she was 54. It was the first of her books to gain popularity, winning the Parents Choice award. The story’s in the guise of a young girl’s journal during a family canoe trip, illustrated in colored pencil. Like all of Williams’ books, it has a big generous heart. That’s the part that grabs me.

But Vera B. Williams was not just a children’s author and illustrator. The same year Three Days was published, she spent a month at Alderson Federal Prison Camp following arrest at a women’s peaceful blockade of the Pentagon.

As she wrote, “At various times I have helped start a cooperative housing community, an alternative school, a peace center, and a bakery where young people could work. I have worked to end nuclear power and weapons, and for women’s rights. I have demonstrated and been jailed. I have produced posters, leaflets, magazine covers, drawings, paintings, short stories, and poem, as well as books.” To which I would add she was also a school teacher and the mother of three.

Bookwise, she went on to write and illustrate the Caldecott honor book, More, More, More Said the Baby, inspired by her first grandchild.

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And the Rosa trilogy, including Caldecott-winning A Chair for My Mother.

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My favorite of the Rosa books is Music, Music for Everyone  in which Rosa and her friends form a band to raise money for her grandmother’s medical care. Here’s my favorite (wordless) spread, at the climax.

DANCE

As you can see, decades before the call went out for more diversity in picture books, Vera B. Williams’ stories were inclusive across all racial and economic lines. I love that.

• • • • •

Like Vera Williams, I was in my early forties when I started trying to make picture books. To figure it out, I studied the books my kids and I had loved the most. I made  thumbnail grids of Vera B. Williams’ books to teach myself about pacing and page turns. I pored over her illustrations noting point of view, character depiction, color, flow.

Early on, I attended a workshop that brought together teachers and authors. That’s when I first met Ms. Williams in person. She was an intense little person, already in her 60s. I had a minute to talk to her while she signed a book and I quickly told her how she’d inspired me to try to publish a book. She endured my gushing with equanimity.

I sent her copies of my first board books when they came out in 1994. She sent back an encouraging note.

• • • • •

I am a total fan of Vera B. Williams’ books. But she did not write them for me. Luckily, I got to see how her books impact young readers the year I volunteered as a writing coach in Lilly Rainwater’s fourth/fifth grade split at Hawthorne Elementary.

The kids I worked with at Hawthorne came from all walks of life and many ethnic backgrounds. When we were working on personal narratives, I brought in Williams’ last book, published in 2001, Amber Was Brave, Essie Was Smart.

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It is a story for older kids, told in poems and pictures. It recounts what happens to two girls whose father goes to prison and then returns.

For months, each week when I returned to the classroom, that book would be in another student’s desk. It made the rounds. These kids had relatives and friends who were in prison. They had had to be brave and smart. The book resonated.

Which, in the end, is what all Vera B. Williams’ books do. Whether it’s a grandma sweeping up a baby to love in More, More, More, or little girl saving up money for A Chair for My Mother, Williams’ stories give us the best of what it is to be human.

Though I wish there were more, more, more Vera B. Williams’ books, I am forever grateful that she showed us all a picture book can be.

Now that’s a life well-lived.

10 responses to “REMEMBERING VERA B. WILLIAMS

  1. Thank you for this beautiful tribute, Laura, inspiring and encouraging, and so real. Nancy Bo Flood

  2. What a lovely, heartfelt tribute, Laura. Thank you for sending me back to her books for another look…
    Karen

  3. Thank you, Laura! Beautiful!

  4. Thank you for this post . I did not know this illustrator. I just ordered one of her books. Msquared

  5. I didn’t know that Vera Williams had been such an inspiration to you. Both of you have given children many fine stories with “a big generous heart.” I especially enjoyed sharing her story A Chair for my Mother. Students were captivated by the reality of the story as well as heartened by the hopeful resolution. What a lovely tribute.

  6. Thanks! I need to find More, More, More on the bookshelf and make a cup of tea….So glad to take the time to read your post.
    Mary

  7. Thank you, Laura!

  8. “A Chair for My Mother” is one of my favourites.

  9. What a beautiful tribute, Laura. Thank you! I could never read More, More, More Said The Baby without tears coming to my eyes. So simple yet so emotionally clear and intense. I have not seen many of her other books and will have to look them up. I had no idea she was so politically outspoken and active. What an inspiring woman. I envy you having met her!

  10. Oh my, I had not heard, thanks for sharing Laura! I am, I think, well known for using as part of my personal lexicon “More, more, more said the baby” it is a favorite of mine particularly “Little Bird” effortlessly multicultural, multigenerational, and perfection in board book as well as picture book. I have developed a repertoire of tunes that the phrase fits with…think “Bang, bang, bang, went the trolley”…More, more, more Vera B. would have been great but what we have are little bits of perfection.

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