Tag Archives: vintage children’s books

Duvoisin II

Last month I warned I might revisit Roger Duvoisin’s work in picture books. So, here are two more of his books from my shelves: Donkey-donkey (1940) and Petunia (1950).

img_20181019_152723.jpg

img_20181019_153052

Unlike A Child’s Garden of Verses, these two books are authored by Duvoisin as well. His writing style matches his illustrations – light and delightful.

The themes are similar – animals wanting to better themselves somehow and making themselves and others suffer for it. Silly animals.

Using animals to upstage human folly is common in literature. Duvoisin’s squiggly images help us laugh at the situations such foolish creatures get themselves into.

img_20181019_152708

Donkey-donkey is a happy donkey until he starts comparing himself to Pat, the horse.

img_20181019_152736

He becomes dissatisfied with his big donkey ears and gets advice from everyone else at the farm on what to do about it.

img_20181019_170241img_20181019_170300img_20181019_170323img_20181019_152922img_20181019_152855

As we expect, he comes around to accepting his ears and going back to his happy donkey life.

img_20181019_153115

Petunia is literally a silly goose. She finds a book and has heard that ‘He who owns Books and loves them is wise,’ so she picks up the book and carries it around with her, feeling very wise indeed.

img_20181019_153134img_20181019_153340

Petunia’s pride in her new-found wisdom leads her to mis-advise all the other animals at the farm.

img_20181019_153219img_20181019_153231

This causes misery and mayhem.

She is too busy being wise to notice until the situation becomes explosive.

img_20181019_172551

At this point she notices the book has something in it, namely pages, with words on them that she cannot read. Now she understands, ‘It was not enough to carry wisdom under my wing, I must put it in my mind an in my heart. and to do that I must learn to read.”

img_20181019_153320

Be true to yourself.

Wisdom only comes from books if you use them correctly.

If a goose can learn to read, so can you.

Good lessons at any age.

 

 

A Child’s Garden of Images by Roger Duvoisin

Well, while I am waiting for production to continue on Where Lily Isn’t (the designer at the publishing house just left, so the search is on for a replacement, *sigh*…) I will entertain both you and myself by looking through the books in my kid lit collection.

Today I pulled out a book that was a gift from a friend – A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson, illustrated by Roger Duvoisin (The Heritage Press: 1944). Lucky for me she had two in her collection.

I have a few books illustrated by Duvoisin (you may know his work from his 1950 book Petunia). His drawings are joyful and loose, sometimes on the edge of silly. His illustrations are from the era when colored images were prepared for printing by separating them manually into multiple plates (as would be done in traditional printmaking). The plates were then printed in individual ink tones, usually including a yellow, a red, a blue or green, and black. The results create an appealingly limited palette of graphic shapes and patterns. I am a fan!

Below from ‘Foreign Lands’:

I love how the girl’s feet exit the top of the image in ‘The Swing’, although the flattened perspective makes me worry a bit for her safety on the way down:

‘The Cow’: Perhaps a precursor to Petunia?

‘Travel’:

‘My Ship And I’:

The illustrations for the book aren’t all in color. There are many lovely black and white images, such as this for ‘The Little Land’:

and this for ‘My Shadow”:

Also for ‘Little Land’:R Duvoisin-Childs Garden of Verses-The Little Land 2

‘Autumn Fires’: Do we not feel the loss of summer looming?

‘To Minnie’: That is some rug!

For all you picture book folk – ‘Picture Books In Winter’:R Duvoisin-Childs Garden of Verses-Picture Books In Winter

And finally, a peek under the jacket cover:

Perhaps for my next post I will show more of Duvoisin’s work. It is worth exploring further.

Books Across the Ocean

Edward Bawden tote bagFaithful readers of this blog will know that I was in London last week, along with my husband Joe. We stayed with Margaret, Bradley and Clare. They were generous hosts and brilliant guides.IMG_0270They fed our stomachs, eyes, hearts and minds.IMG_0324It will take a while to digest everything!IMG_0463We saw so much, including many wonderful old and new books.IMG_0194Here are a few book covers and illustrations from the trip.
Old:punch

IMG_0141Older:bestiariumNewish birds from Edward Bawden (1903-1989):Edward BawdenAnd cats, also from Edward Bawden:Edward BawdenEdward BawdenEdward BawdenWe took a side trip to Amsterdam where we saw some volksvertelsels (folk tales). Old…books in Amsterdamand new (Beautiful Griselda illustrated by Isol):GriseldeHere are images from De Direntoen: a Netherlands edition of a book by André Hellé called Drôles de Bêtes, originally published in 1911 in Paris.andre helleandre helle IMG_0200andre helleandre helleandre helleandre helleBack in London: old games at the Sunbury Flea Market.IMG_0444IMG_0421 (1)IMG_0413 (1)This is just a taste of what we saw. Right now I am feeling jet-lagged, but replete.Bawden backwardsHow many miles to London town?
Four score and ten.
Can you get there by candle light?
Aye – and back again.Museum of childhood V and A